David Christopher Rich ’19

I worked in a lab as a UROP that focused on the use of nanoparticles for drug delivery. I was heavily inspired by this work, and sought out classes that would fill in the gaps in my knowledge from this research experience.

David Christopher Rich '19
10-Eng Concentration: Materials Process and Design

Why did you decide on course 10?

I have always been interested in the medical sciences in general, but never really had any desire to be just a doctor. I wanted to better understand the chemical basis for human health, and I believed that chemical engineering would be a rigorous and interesting way to get a foundation in that knowledge.

What attracted you to 10-ENG?

I worked in a lab as a UROP that focused on the use of nanoparticles for drug delivery. I was heavily inspired by this work, and sought out classes that would fill in the gaps in my knowledge from this research experience. I found that getting a better understanding of materials would be necessary to be able to fully appreciate the research being done. This led me to eventually switch into 10-ENG.

How was your experience designing your curriculum?

It was sometimes a moving target, finding classes that would both be interesting and that would fit into my schedule. But in the end there was a great number of options available to the various concentrations, and the flexibility offered by the department helped settle on something ultimately fulfilling.

What are you doing now?

I now have plans to go to graduate school and pursue graduate studies at the intersection of materials science, chemical engineering, and human health.

Do you think 10-ENG is beneficial for undergrads?

I absolutely do! 10B is a well-established example of “concentrating” in something on top of the already-established engineering curriculum, so why not give students the opportunity to concentrate in other topics as well? I think it’s a great opportunity for students to explore the things they find most interesting.